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Monday, April 02, 2018

City Hall - Disneyland

 I needed a place to put this so I would remember and what better place than my blog :)
***I need to add my pictures

 The faux bookcase is located in City Hall, and can easily be overlooked. Examine each of the book titles and their authors, you will be surprised.
• Alice in Wonderland by The Hatter
• Cinderella by Drusilla / Anastasia
• Mickey Mouse by Disney
• Lillybelle by W. E. Disney
• Wonderful World of Color
Hunchback of Notre Dame by Quasimodo
• Mary Poppins by The Banks
• Walt and You by Sidejas, Kimbrell (1)
• Pollyana by Polly Harrington
• The Real Little Mermaid by Scuttle
• Lambert the Sheepish Lion
by Peet, Wright & Banta (2)
• Aladdin by Abu
Hercules by Megara
• Sleeping Beauty by Flora, Fauna and Merryweather
• Jungle Book by Mancub
• Pinocchio by J. Cricket
• 101 Dalmations by DeVille
• Beauty and the Beast by Cogsworth and Lumiere
Snow White by Seven Authors
• Mulan by Mulan
• Peter Pan by The Lost Boys
• The Sign Painting Course by Matthews (3)

Let's take a look at some of the books you'll find in the bookcase at City Hall and what they might mean!

What's important to notice with these books is the author. In some cases, it might give us an interesting insight into the character and storyline. Imagine if the Hatter had written Alice in Wonderland?

I assume that this version of Cinderella by Drusilla and Anastasia tells quite a different tale.

We've got Mickey Mouse written by Disney and Lillybelle by W.E. Disney. Is Lillybelle a book about his wife or the engine from the Carolwood-Pacific? Could it be a reference to the private car on the Disneyland Railroad?

Lots of great titles in this section! Wonderful World of Color is a reference to the classic television show and by extension, the new fountain show at California Adventure.

Hunchback of Notre Dame by Quasimodo is pretty obvious.

The Banks wrote Mary Poppins. Of course, Mary Poppins is the nanny to the Banks family: George; Winifred; Jane; and Michael. I'd like to read what the different family members thought about the practically perfect Poppins.

Walt and You has two authors: Sidejas and Kimbrell. Ray Sidejas was the former operations manager for custodial services. Bruce Kimbrell is with the Disney Institute and wrote the Disney training program, Walt Disney and You.

Jane Wyman played Polly Harrington in the film (and book) Pollyanna. She was Pollyanna's aunt in the town of Harrington.

 It seems like Scuttle (definitely not a guppy) wrote this version of the Little Mermaid while Abu, the scene-stealing monkey penned Aladdin.

Lambert the Sheepish Lion, was a 1952 animated short that was written by Bill Peet, Ralph Wright and Milt Banta.

Hercules was penned by none other than Megara (hands down, she is my favorite Disney heroine).

Sleeping Beauty was written by Flora, Fauna and Merryweather, also known as the three good fairies.

Mancub wrote the Jungle Book. It's probably safe to assume that his tale is a little different from the published works and the animated feature.

J. Cricket wrote Pinocchio. It's probably safe to assume that he's no fool.

The last book in this section is 101 Dalmatians by DeVille. Her version might be a little spotty, though.

Cogsworth and Lumiere penned Beauty and the Beast. It's probably a tale as old as time, with some great banter.

Snow White was written by Seven Authors. Telling the story from seven different points a view was a spectacular idea; more authors should work together like this.  

The true autobiography on this shelf, Mulan was written by herself. It's a strong tale of heroes, family and love.

The Lost Boys talk about Peter Pan. It's an inspiring tale of never growing up and finding your marbles.

The last book is The Sign Painting Course by Matthews. This is a reference to a real book by author E.C. Matthews, who also wrote other titles about sign painting, animation and illustration in the late 1920s.

Eric Christian Matthews lived from 1892-1977. I would assume that his books were in the studio library and might have influenced the earliest animates shorts (title cards) and, quite possibly, the various windows throughout Disneyland.

The above article is titled "City Hall Reading" written by George Taylor and courtesy of MiceChat

(1) Ray Sidejas, Manager, Disneyland Custodial Guest Services Bruce Kibrell wrote Disney and You in-house Disney training handbook

(2) Lambert the Sheepish Lion - a 1952 Disney animated short, written by Bill Peet, Ralph Wright & Milt Banta. The 8-minute film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Short Subject, Cartoons.

(3) The Sign Painting Course is a real book by E.C. (Eric Christian) Mathews. He also wrote How to Draw Funny Pictures: A Complete Course in Cartooning.




Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Coffee Houses New things to do in Cali

 
 
Coffee shops are where we go to experience the vibe of a new city or to check out the local flavor of a neighborhood. These 10 coffee shops in Southern California offer a whole lot more than just a great cup of java. You’ll find spots with killer outdoor spaces, some with live music, and others with a unique brewing technique that you may have never heard of before. Whether you are in your own town or on a little mini getaway somewhere new, these coffee shops are a treat to check out as they will infuse your day with a cup full of happiness.
1. Taza - A Social Coffeehouse in Arcadia   - A communal table where strangers can gather and sit and sip and chat makes me love this place even more. What people say most about Taza is that they love the local vibe and love the artisan coffee that is made with care.
2. Full of Beans in Ojai   - If you happen to find yourself in Ojai for a little getaway, this is a coffee shop you should check out. Great atmosphere inside and out including a covered patio in the back that is tucked away from the rest of the world.
 3. Krakatoa in the Golden Hill neighborhood of San Diego  - The outdoor space at Krakatoa is a heavenly oasis. Warning: if you check out this coffee shop you may never want to leave. The coffee and food and lush covered patio could easily make you want to stay all day.
 4. Balconi Coffee Company in Los Angeles   -Have you ever heard of the Siphon Method? Well that's what they do here and they do it well. If you don't know what it is, it looks a bit like a chemistry lab while they concoct the best cup of coffee you will ever experience.
5. Dripp in Chino Hills and Fullerton - Specializing in coffee AND ice cream sandwiches -- I think I may have found my new love.
 
6. Old Cal Coffee in San Marcos - The sense of community is one of the first things you notice at Old Cal Coffee, which is the oldest coffee shop in the area. People gather here to connect and they are made to feel welcome. For local music this place can't be beat as they regularly feature local musicians that brew up some epic coffeehouse concerts.
7. Alta Coffee and Restaurant in Newport Beach - Tucked off the main road, this coffee shop is a quaint find with great food and a nice lineup of events including live poetry and music. But the best part about this place is that it feels like home. Just as an example, there is a wall dedicated to regular customers where they keep their very own coffee mugs. How's that for local charm!
 
8. Another Kind of Sunrise in Venice Beach - This coffee shop is the tiniest one on the list and its cuteness factor is through the roof. Tucked off the street down an artistic looking alley, you will find this locally owned and operated coffee stand that serves "buttery" coffee named after the owner. It also dishes up some dreamy baked goods.
 













9. Joshua Tree Coffee Company - If you don't have plans go to Joshua Tree for its epic beauty, at least go there to experience Joshua Tree Coffee Company. They first started roasting beans in a small roaster in their kitchen and have since graduated to much larger and fancier equipment. They believe in only the best coffee beans that are organic, fair trade and rain forest alliance certified; they are passionate about educating the public on why buying and consuming this type of bean is important. This place is special and not just because it's in Joshua Tree, but because of the passion and heart that is apparent in the product they produce.  The Siphon Method in action at Joshua Tree Coffee Company, too.
10. Hidden House Coffee in San Juan Capistrano - Old fashioned and charming in every way. This gem is tucked away on a delightful street with old homes that have been converted into shops and boutiques. Hidden House makes me want to perch on the patio in a cozy spot with a cup of coffee and a good book.
All of these spots make me want to linger for a while. Did you see any of your favorite places on the list? Let us know what other coffee shops are a must to experience in Southern California for great coffee and a great atmosphere.
 

 



Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Toon Town Hidden Mickeys










Hidden Mickey's Main Street



 turn your head sideways





Disney Characters








Hidden Mickeys

For Christmas this year I bought myself a year of Disney. Yes I have an annual pass for 2018.
One thing that I would like to do is find all the hidden Mickeys. Wanda and I each have a book while they are different they have some similarities. This makes for a great day.
We did our first Hidden Mickey hunt on 1/14/2018.
Here are a few of the mickeys we found in fantasyland.







Accountability

I am going to use this post to track those projects that I want to complete in 2018
1.south Dakota book
2. Alaska book
3. 2016 daily book
4. 2017 daily book

Friday, December 15, 2017

A Family Secret


I have been with my husband over 20 years married for almost 10. Every year we indulge in something called Biscochitos. it is a cookie with roots in NM. It is an amazing smell when you walk in a restaurant and they are baking. I have tried for years to get my hands on a family recipe to no avail. Well doing some genealogy research and attending my MIL service in 2016 I met some of the most amazing people. Tim's cousin Donna shared her grandmas recipe with me. Oh the excitement the tears the goosebumps. Tim's cousin grandma is Tim's mom's sister which means somewhere in this recipe is things that Nana did --- I can't tell you how excited I AM.
The secret to good cookies is using lard . It makes them very tender .
1c sugar , 2 cups pure lard , 1tsp anise seed , cream mixture together until creamy , add 2 eggs beaten , add 6 c flour 3 tsp baking powder , 1 tsp salt , 1/4c water as needed . Roll dough , cut in shapes , dust top of cookies with sugar and cinnamon mix . Bake at 350 for 8 -10 min or until golden brown . That's it , let me know how they come out . Happy holidays .




Tuesday, October 03, 2017

Harvest - Bible study


Courage. Faith. Persistence. Prayer. Redemption. Does God work through the circumstances and events of people's lives to bring about His plan? Join us as we trace the stories of two ordinary people who risked everything to trust God's extraordinary plan to save their people and see their nation restored.
 
Our 2017-2018 Virtue study series begins October 4-5, 2017 and runs through May 2018.

The Rebuilt Life
The Chosen Life


Studies in Nehemiah and Ester



Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Grief

The Five (or Seven) Stages of Grief

   J | Your Tribute Founder
Many people refer to the five stages of grief. If you have lost someone or know someone who has, you will come across many articles about moving through these stages. What you do not often see is the seven stages of grief model.This model closely follows the five stages model, with two additional platforms: pain/guilt and the upward turn. In essence, these emotions or stages are included in the five stages model, but they are not listed separately.
Here, then, are the seven stages of grief explained.

1. Shock and Denial

When a person first learns of the death of a loved one, they often meet the news with a sense of disbelief. People describe feeling numb. This is a normal and innate reaction that helps to shield your brain from the pain of the loss. Rather than being overwhelmed by multiple emotions at once, you move through this stage as your mind prepares to deal with the loss.

2. Pain and Guilt

Within days, the shock of the news begins to wear off. As it does, it is replaced by heartbreaking pain. At times, your pain will seem unbearable. To move through the grieving process successfully, allow yourself to feel the pain. Trying to hide the pain or mask it with substances like drugs and alcohol only extends your grief.
During this stage, you may find yourself dealing with feelings of guilt. You may feel guilty because things were left unsaid. You may feel guilty because you are angry with your loved one for dying. This is often the scariest phase of the grieving process because the emotions are so raw.

3. Anger and Bargaining

During this stage of grief, your frustration is replaced by anger. It is not unusual for people in this stage of grief to lash out at friends and family members. People may even violently lash out at inanimate objects. You may even lay the blame for your loved one’s death on someone completely innocent.
While many of your close friends and loved ones will tolerate your outbursts, they will do so only for a short time. Do your best to control your anger. You do not want to lose established relationships because of your loss.
You will also find yourself bargaining during this stage of grief. You will never do X if your loved one is returned to you. You will do Y if you can just see your loved one once more. Even though a part of you knows that having your loved one returned to you is not possible, you will have these thoughts.

  

4. Depression

Depression, sadness and loneliness are the emotions that people most often associate with grief. The difficult part of this stage is that it comes just when people think you should be getting over the death. Your friends and family may try to talk you out of your feelings and despair that their words do not help you.
During the stage of grief, people often realize, for the first time, the enormity of their loss. You may find that you do not want to socialize, preferring to be left alone with your feelings. You may also find yourself dealing with severe feelings of despair and emptiness. Feeling as though nothing and no one can make you feel like yourself again is normal. Feeling as though you will never “feel better” is also normal during this stage of grief.

5. The Upward Turn

This is the second stage that the five-stages model leaves out. It is most often combined with the acceptance stage in that model. During this stage of grief, you will find that your life begins to slowly return to a sense of normalcy. You feel calm and get yourself organized. Any physical symptoms that you have been experiencing will lessen, and you will feel your depression begin to lift.

6. Reconstruction

Now that you have become more functional and organized, your mind begins to refocus on you again. You realize that this is a process that you have worked through, and you begin to focus on the steps that you need to take to rebuild your life and move on.
If you shared finances with the person who is deceased, you begin to put together a financial plan. If you shared a home, you begin to determine whether or not you can, or want to, live in the home alone. During reconstruction, you begin to put the pieces back together so that you can move on with your life.

7. Acceptance

It’s important to understand that all people do not enter the acceptance phase. It can be incredibly difficult to accept the death of a loved one and, unfortunately, some people simply cannot, no matter how hard they try. For others, reaching the acceptance stage is the final step in completing the grieving process.
During this stage, people accept and deal with reality. Do not confuse this stage with happiness. In truth, people in this stage have simply decided that although they cannot return to the person that they were before the death of their loved one, they can more forward and become a different person. People in the acceptance stage are able to make plans for the future.
When you have reached acceptance, you are able to remember your loved one fondly, even laughing at your funnier memories. You may still experience pangs of sadness, but the happy memories outweigh the pain that you feel. You know without a doubt that you will be able to find happiness and joy again.

If you keep anything about the seven stages of grief in mind, make it this: Everyone grieves, and everyone handles the process differently. There is no right or wrong way to grieve, providing that you are not harming yourself or others. Take your time as you navigate through the stages; when you grieve in a healthy way, you emerge from your sadness in a positive way.


Friday, February 03, 2017

Breaking Twig - yeah i am back to reading

Set in rural Georgia in the 1960s, BREAKING TWIG is a coming-of-age novel about Becky (Twig) Cooper, a young woman trying to survive the physical and emotional abuse of her mother, Helen, a beautiful, calculating woman who can, with a mere look, send the meanest cur in Sugardale, Georgia running for its life.

Not even Twig's vivid imagination, keen wit, and dark sense of humor is enough to help her survive the escalating assaults of Helen and a new stepbrother, but help comes from an unexpected source--Frank, her stepfather. Sometimes, having one person who loves and believes in you is all a girl needs to keep hope alive.

Often raw and irreverent and sprinkled with all the Southern flavoring found in a good bowl of chicken and dumplings, BREAKING TWIG, is about finding love where we least expect it, destroying lives with easy lies, and realizing each of us determine our own truth.